Technology

Where to Get Mutual Fund Data

When it comes to investing in mutual funds,  data is everything. After all, how can you make informed investment decisions without access to accurate and up-to-date information?

Even as a distributor,  if you don’t have the latest data on performance, assets under management (AUM), and other key indicators, you’re at a competitive disadvantage.

So where can you go to get this essential information? Let’s take a look at some of the best sources for mutual fund data.

1. Delta Data

Delta Data is one of the top mutual fund data providers, offering resourceful mutual data and analytics. They offer a comprehensive database that includes CIT Data information on a large number of mutual funds, making us one of the largest in the industry.

In addition to mutual fund oversight, they also offer news and updates, commentary, and other resources that can help you stay on top of the latest developments in the industry.

One thing that you will love about Delta Data is that their data is updated regularly. As such, you can be confident that you’re always getting the most accurate information available.

2. Morningstar

If you want comprehensive data on mutual funds, you definitely won’t go wrong with Morningstar. This website offers detailed information on a wide range of investment products, including mutual funds.

In addition to giving you access to key data points like performance, asset allocation, and fees, Morningstar also provides in-depth analysis and commentary on individual mutual funds. This can be extremely helpful if you’re trying to get a better understanding of how a particular fund operates.

3. The Investment Company Institute (ICI)

The ICI is the trade association for the mutual fund industry, so it’s no surprise that they offer a wealth of data on mutual funds.

On their website, you can access a variety of resources, including:

  • Performance data: The ICI provides detailed performance data for both equity and bond mutual funds. This information is updated on a monthly basis.
  • AUM data: The ICI’s website includes data on total assets under management for both retail and institutional investors. This information is updated quarterly.
  • Fund flows data: The ICI tracks mutual fund flows (i.e., money flowing into and out of mutual funds) on a monthly basis. This data can be helpful in understanding investor sentiment.

4. The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC)

The SEC is the primary regulatory body for the investment industry, so it’s no surprise that they offer a wealth of data on mutual funds.

Their website gives you access to:

  • Mutual fund filings: All mutual fund companies are required to file periodic reports with the SEC. These reports contain detailed information on the fund’s holdings, performance, and expenses.
  • Proxy statements: Every year, mutual fund companies must send shareholders a proxy statement. This document contains important information on the fund’s operations and management.
  • Investor bulletins: The SEC’s website also includes a series of investor bulletins that provide general information on investing in mutual funds.

5. FINRA’s Fund Analyzer

FINRA is the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, a self-regulatory organization that oversees the investment industry.

One of the tools they offer is the FINRA Fund Analyzer, which allows you to research mutual funds and exchange-traded funds (ETFs). This tool provides data on performance, fees, holdings, and more.

6. Yahoo Finance

Yahoo Finance is a popular website that offers a variety of financial information, including data on mutual funds.

You can find the following information on their website:

  • Performance data: Yahoo Finance provides detailed performance data for both equity and bond mutual funds. This information is updated on a daily basis.
  • AUM data: Yahoo Finance’s website includes data on total assets under management for both retail and institutional investors. This information is updated daily.
  • Fund flows data: Yahoo Finance tracks mutual fund flows (i.e., money flowing into and out of mutual funds) on a weekly basis. This data can be helpful in understanding investor sentiment.

There you go,

No matter what your needs are, one of these six sites will definitely have the mutual fund data you’re looking for. So get out there and start researching!

Do you have a favorite site for mutual fund data? Let us know in the comments below.

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